New Featured Courses for the New Year

New Featured Courses for the New Year

We change these about every two weeks, and choose them based on a variety of factors. We try to feature a range of providers, fields, and levels of difficulty. We look for vivid course descriptions that promise an enthusiastic and articulate professor. We research the professors to find a mixture of backgrounds and skill sets which we hope will appeal to Knollop students. And we aim for a mix of reviewed and unreviewed courses.

Essentially, we do our best to feature courses which we believe will be good experiences for our members! And here’s what we’ve got for you now:

New Featured Courses for the New Year

From the other side of the world, Knollop and Open2Study bring you a course on Indigenous Studies: Australia and New Zealand. This course focuses on “the distinctive stories of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia and Māori people in Aotearoa New Zealand.” The four sections of the class will cover a wide range, including Māori migration theories and the seven waka and Māori customary locations and traditional worldviews, and how Australia and Aotearoa were ‘discovered’ ‘renamed’ and ‘claimed’. Your leaders will be two excellent profs from the area: Prof. Maggie Walter, a descendant of the trawlwoolway/prelunnener people from North Eastern Tasmania; and Prof. Huia Tomlins-Jahnke, who is Ngati Kahungunu Ngati Toarangatira, Ngai nTahu and Ngati Hine.

New Featured Courses for the New YearFrom the National University of Singapore’s classrooms comes Valerio Scarani, whose goal (as he says on his excellent blog) is to “share ideas on how to spread the exciting discoveries of quantum physics beyond the academic boundaries.” He teaches Unpredictable? Randomness, Chance, and Free Will, which began this past Monday. Prof. Scarani promises to teach you about “the usefulness of randomness in communication and computation, the intrinsic randomness of quantum phenomena, the unpredictability of the weather, and the implications of the neural activity of the brain on our ‘free will.’”

From the halls of Harvard we bring you an Introduction to Computer Science. Enrollment in this Ivy League entry-level course jumped 590% in 10 years, and you can be part of the trend through EdX! Prof. David J. Malan will teach beginners how to think algorithmically and solve problems efficiently. Through videos, problem sets, quizzes, and a final project, you’ll cover six languages and topics like security and abstraction. The eight problem sets are even inspired by the real-world domains of biology, cryptography, finance, forensics, and gaming.

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